Humidity packs…good or bad

Humidity Packs

  • Yes

    Votes: 4 80.0%
  • No

    Votes: 1 20.0%

  • Total voters
    5

curious101

Active member
Hey everyone

I was wondering the communities thoughts on Integra and Boveda

For long term storage are they helpful or more of a gimmick for rehydrating dry stashes?
Thanks
 

Mark

Active member
I'm still experimenting with them a little. I like to have it in a 'ready to cure' state of dryness before adding adding them to the jars but I'm experimenting to find if fully curing first is better. I've also been experimenting with freeze curing which has diverted my interest.

I'm convinced they are good for long term storage but don't expect them to work if you start with too much moisture or too little in the product to being with.
 

curious101

Active member
I'm still experimenting with them a little. I like to have it in a 'ready to cure' state of dryness before adding adding them to the jars but I'm experimenting to find if fully curing first is better. I've also been experimenting with freeze curing which has diverted my interest.

I'm convinced they are good for long term storage but don't expect them to work if you start with too much moisture or too little in the product to being with.
I am still testing the best time to add these as well

Too early seems to have a negative impact

too late and plants seems harder to adjust humidity wise

Lately I beenthrowing them in after 3 weeks in the jar then burp it and additional week or 2
 

Indi

Active member
I always use them.
After the initial cure and burping I seal lid or packet and 9-16 months later still perfect.

You can reuse them by soaking them in distilled water but always use distilled water.
If you are a perfectionist toss in a WiFi rh meter and you’ll always know the RH content without opening or breaking seal.
 

RastaKev

Active member
I use them due to the constantly fluctuating temperature and humidity levels in the shyte condo unit I live in with my wife (Rosebud) of 35+ years ❤🌹
Boveda seems to be popular as well as Integra Boost. I recently found a brand named, ongrok. Currently running a test of all 3 in some glass jars of Black Widow.

Peace be with you 🙏

Let love rule and get high 😎
 

dioecious

Member
I had a buddy who left like twenty pounds in turkey bags in a barn. A handful had the humidity packs and the the rest did not. Like four years after the cure the only ones which were not entirely unsmokeable were the ones with the humidity pack. Now, does this mean anything if you are taking care of your weed? I really don’t know. Did he put the humidity packs in the better selected units, making their preservation more about their starting quality that the packs? Again, no idea. My suspicion is they helped a lot.
 

longball

MNS Award Winner
From Boveda: https://bovedainc.com/question/how-long-does-boveda-last-3/

" How long does Boveda last for cannabis and hemp?
Boveda will last from 2 to 6 months depending on your cannabis/hemp container and its surrounding environment. In its original packaging, Boveda has a two-year shelf life."

"More exposure to air means it has to work harder ( https://bovedainc.com/how-to-use-boveda-for-cannabis/ )"
In other words, they don't like exposure to oxygen. They will only last a few hours on your kitchen table. They will last much longer in a full jar than a half empty jar. Source: My experience with them and info on their website.


I keep a Boveda pack and a hydrometer in every jar that is not either vacuum sealed or in the freezer. No need for them if your jars/containers are vacuum sealed or frozen. For me, they last up to 2 years "depending on your cannabis/hemp container and its surrounding environment." The 'variables' involved in that last sentence will depend on how long your pack lasts. No scientific experiments, just my observations and recordings after 4 continuous years using them . Your mileage may vary. A lot.

Longball
 

curious101

Active member
From Boveda: https://bovedainc.com/question/how-long-does-boveda-last-3/

" How long does Boveda last for cannabis and hemp?
Boveda will last from 2 to 6 months depending on your cannabis/hemp container and its surrounding environment. In its original packaging, Boveda has a two-year shelf life."

"More exposure to air means it has to work harder ( https://bovedainc.com/how-to-use-boveda-for-cannabis/ )"
In other words, they don't like exposure to oxygen. They will only last a few hours on your kitchen table. They will last much longer in a full jar than a half empty jar. Source: My experience with them and info on their website.


I keep a Boveda pack and a hydrometer in every jar that is not either vacuum sealed or in the freezer. No need for them if your jars/containers are vacuum sealed or frozen. For me, they last up to 2 years "depending on your cannabis/hemp container and its surrounding environment." The 'variables' involved in that last sentence will depend on how long your pack lasts. No scientific experiments, just my observations and recordings after 4 continuous years using them . Your mileage may vary. A lot.

Longball
Why are they not necessary when vacuum sealing

I normally put one in before Ivacuum seal the jars
 

longball

MNS Award Winner
@curious101 asked: "Why are they not necessary when vacuum sealing"

A good vacuum seal(er) will remove ALL the gases(most importantly oxygen) in a container. This limits the amount of molecular activity that can take place in the container, such as drying out, decay, etc. That is why vegetables and meat will stay fresh for a year or two(or longer in a freezer). The Boveda pack contains some air and water and therefore has hydrogen, oxygen, and other gases in it so you don't have a true vacuum in the container. While I don't think it will affect it much, still, something that costs a couple dollars is being used where it is not needed.

In summary, you spend money on a vacuum sealer, you take the time to remove gases like hydrogen and oxygen from the container, then you put a Boveda pack that contains hydrogen and oxygen back into the container. That is why Boveda packs are not necessary when vacuum sealing.

Longball
 

curious101

Active member
@curious101 asked: "Why are they not necessary when vacuum sealing"

A good vacuum seal(er) will remove ALL the gases(most importantly oxygen) in a container. This limits the amount of molecular activity that can take place in the container, such as drying out, decay, etc. That is why vegetables and meat will stay fresh for a year or two(or longer in a freezer). The Boveda pack contains some air and water and therefore has hydrogen, oxygen, and other gases in it so you don't have a true vacuum in the container. While I don't think it will affect it much, still, something that costs a couple dollars is being used where it is not needed.

In summary, you spend money on a vacuum sealer, you take the time to remove gases like hydrogen and oxygen from the container, then you put a Boveda pack that contains hydrogen and oxygen back into the container. That is why Boveda packs are not necessary when vacuum sealing.

Longball
My wallet appreciates you!!!
 

musashi

Site Moderator
Staff member
Seems a lot of people use paper bags as part of the process

What’s the reasoning
Sweating. Provides a microclimate in a slower drying environment. With delicate sativas, I guage how long on the line before they become a crispy wisp. Paperbags aids in drying the inside of the bud without excessive drying of the outside- a more uniform dry. I find they cure better in the bottle and don't go to ammonia and hops as quickly. It is an option depending on environmental conditions i.e. winter vs summer and changing humidity levels.
@longball is spot on about O2 degradation. Light plays into this also. For the longer term, I foodsaver the medicine and then store the packages in 5 gallon buckets labeled "lentils." The buckets are put the back of the cool pantry along with the rice and beans lol.
foodsaver.jpg

mu
 

curious101

Active member
I always use them.
After the initial cure and burping I seal lid or packet and 9-16 months later still perfect.

You can reuse them by soaking them in distilled water but always use distilled water.
If you are a perfectionist toss in a WiFi rh meter and you’ll always know the RH content without opening or breaking seal.
Do you mean vacuum seal?
 
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