Fixing a magnetic ballast

visceraeyes88

Active member
Hey, was buying an ac the other day and homeboy had a magnetic ballast that he gave me. It's brand new, but messed up.
He didn't have the power cable plugged in all of the way and the rubber/plastic connector on the ballast is a little melted.

Anyone know how I would go about fixing this?
 

n2ishun

Well-known member
It's pretty simple really.
Should be 3 wire connection, white/black/green wires (if it's 120v wired) or red/black/white (if 220v).
If it's euro wired it might be blue/brown and I'm forgetting the 3rd color but I'm thinking it's green ? I rarely see euro spec'd stuff these days.
Go get a 12/3 replacement cord with the appropriate plugin end and pigtails on the other and either wire nut the connections (or better) use solderless crimp sleeves.
Make sure all connections are clean and tight and insulated.
Yes disassembly will be required.
 

quinxstar

MNS Hall of Fame
put a pic of you ballast

normally it is indicated above the + and the - and the earth

brown, blue and green yellow

at usal you have blue/green yellow/brown in this order X2 for the electricity was comming and the out for the lamp sometimes the order is oposite beetween the in and the out not sure to be clear

and try it

i have give it up with magnetic ballast is to much dangerous compareted to electronic
 

visceraeyes88

Active member
It's pretty simple really.
Should be 3 wire connection, white/black/green wires (if it's 120v wired) or red/black/white (if 220v).
If it's euro wired it might be blue/brown and I'm forgetting the 3rd color but I'm thinking it's green ? I rarely see euro spec'd stuff these days.
Go get a 12/3 replacement cord with the appropriate plugin end and pigtails on the other and either wire nut the connections (or better) use solderless crimp sleeves.
Make sure all connections are clean and tight and insulated.
Yes disassembly will be required.
Sorry to be annoying. Been trying to find the part, but no luck. Any way you could give me a link? It's not Euro.
 

n2ishun

Well-known member
What I was meaning(and guess I didn't convey well, or at all) was to forget about the connector, it's not needed or required.
Just find a standard appliance cable and wire it direct, bypassing that burnt connector (which you should remove to allow the wires thru the housing).
I can barely make out the check next to where your ballast signifies it's 120VAC....the wires will be white (neutral), black (L1 or power), and green (ground).
Just match the wire colors and connect with wire nuts or solderless crimp connectors, use lots of electrical tape to ensure everything is very well insulated and protected from any scuffing thru the side of the housing.
Maybe use a zip tie or two to ensure the wires don't get pulled on.
I'm certain I could dig up some connectors for you, but hey, they've already failed once on that ballast and I honestly don't like the things myself.....and they are usually pricey, so screw them.
 

visceraeyes88

Active member
What I was meaning(and guess I didn't convey well, or at all) was to forget about the connector, it's not needed or required.
Just find a standard appliance cable and wire it direct, bypassing that burnt connector (which you should remove to allow the wires thru the housing).
I can barely make out the check next to where your ballast signifies it's 120VAC....the wires will be white (neutral), black (L1 or power), and green (ground).
Just match the wire colors and connect with wire nuts or solderless crimp connectors, use lots of electrical tape to ensure everything is very well insulated and protected from any scuffing thru the side of the housing.
Maybe use a zip tie or two to ensure the wires don't get pulled on.
I'm certain I could dig up some connectors for you, but hey, they've already failed once on that ballast and I honestly don't like the things myself.....and they are usually pricey, so screw them.
Ok, that makes a ton of sense. I just have a healthy fear when it comes to working with things that run electricity through them.
 

visceraeyes88

Active member
What I was meaning(and guess I didn't convey well, or at all) was to forget about the connector, it's not needed or required.
Just find a standard appliance cable and wire it direct, bypassing that burnt connector (which you should remove to allow the wires thru the housing).
I can barely make out the check next to where your ballast signifies it's 120VAC....the wires will be white (neutral), black (L1 or power), and green (ground).
Just match the wire colors and connect with wire nuts or solderless crimp connectors, use lots of electrical tape to ensure everything is very well insulated and protected from any scuffing thru the side of the housing.
Maybe use a zip tie or two to ensure the wires don't get pulled on.
I'm certain I could dig up some connectors for you, but hey, they've already failed once on that ballast and I honestly don't like the things myself.....and they are usually pricey, so screw them.
I just re-read your original reply and it now makes complete sense because of your follow up. Thanks for the super layman's explanation. Lol
 

n2ishun

Well-known member
For the 5-10 bones it'll cost for the cord, I'd at least try the thing.
If it works, rock on, if not, it's not much of a loss.
BTW, steel rusts very easily after a few hot and cold cycles....and we all know old school ballasts get hot, I wouldn't worry about the rust.
 

quinxstar

MNS Hall of Fame
I get that, but just straight user error messed up 1 connection. At the same time, I could just buy another one and put my mind at ease.
if you buy one by an electronic one is really great now

mine it's a 600 and 400 you can swich with a simple button

all the connections are like a pc socket, it's really easy to use

while the magnet can quickly set the house on fire, especially the "chinoiserie" like that
 
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